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address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
that they had in years when they reached the limits the market would take. i think the real lesson for us here is to fundamentals. >> just to wrap this up a little bit, i wanted to do to play god for a moment. >> playing? >> well, perhaps you're already at that state. we've outlined today's challenges short-term, long-term and so forth. if the president were to call you into the oval office and say, okay, all things considered, what should i do? what would you have him do? >> i'd like paul to answer that one first. >> obviously going to make a deal in the short run, because what to do about this untenable situation of the sequester and the tax increases for everybody. so that got to work on a short-term deal, and then hard work on a pretty fundamental look at the tax system, and more or less at the same time you've got to look at certainly social security. certainly you've got to look at medicare, and what can you do that is convincing in terms of the other expenditures over a period of time. i think that's a very tough thing, but these are a consensus on the broad level of spending that we're
in advance of a disaster? i think all of us agree with that. .. being that building relations with the people rising sow africa and the specifically aimed at building a capacity for administering hiv treatment in a country where the civilian authorities said they would never allow it. your point is well taken and sometimes there are opportunities to do that. >> of i can also. one of the most important ways to prevent is to do credible and reliable health surveillance. in many countries for which we have no strong visibility on the presence of infectious disease and with such a mobile world, undetected infectious diseases are a threat to us all. >> thank you. >> if you can see the hands better than i can, people with their hands up, position yourself and we will get the next time around. >> thank you for your presentation. as you know, there has been a debate about what health can contribute to security. there is agreement that health intervention and human security, and also the united states has a major role in humanitarian spots and that is not necessarily driven by national security consid
taxes now, that is not going to play in my judgment with any of us. we are not for raising revenue paid, certainly. second, remember we're at the 18 months ago we passed the debt ceiling increase, and now it's time to do the second debt ceiling increase? we're just a couple months away from having to go to that debate again, and we get to do any of the promise cuts from the 115 months ago. so where are those? this idea that race accident, we promise we'll get to the cuts, now we promise we'll get to the customer american people are saying are you serious? i think is really problematic. >> let's understand the big picture here, and the presence of philosophy. i've been watching, i remember him looking us in the eye the date was february 10, 2009 when he was selling his economic stimulus plan, and he said fdr's new deal actually did work but he should've spent a lot more money and then the records would've shown it. it seemed to me he was looking at writing of unexplained, he convinced me that he is a keynesian economist on steroids. when i look at this sequestration deal, and the fiscal
to keen up with inflation. revenue from duck stants has been used to purchase more than 6 million acres of wet mandates preserving a viable waterfowl population. this is a responsible bill that takes into account the need of the entire sportsmen's community. why is this important? it is important because hunting and fishing and hiking is a way of life in places like montana. one in three montanans hunt big game and more than half of us fish. outdoor recreation economy across this country contributed some $646 million in direct spending to this u.s. economy. fishing and00ing is not just recreation, it is a critical part of our economy. in montana, hunting and fishing alone brings $1 billion a year to our economy. nearly as much as the state's cattle industry. it drives and sustained jobs, and with hunting season in full swing and thousands of montanaians hunting in the back country over the thanksgiving weekend, this bill is as timely as ever. mr. president, the sports men's act of 2012 is balanced, bipartisan, and widely supported. it is also fiscally responsible. the bill has no cost.
are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: yes i would first like to congratulate the american people on using good sense by reelecting a president. mr. romney had no plans. he was just offering the opposite of what the president was presenting to the american people. have no plan for anything. i don't know how anybody in his position could get as far as he did with nothing to offer the american people. the other thing -- i just don't understand how with the american people would think to even consider him as the presidential candidate. he had absolutely nothing to offer. everything he offered was nonexistent or i will just do the president isn't doing. >> host: but the ask you, you sound like you're passionately supportive of the president. >> caller: i'm passionate for the country. i don't care who obama our romney is. i want somebody that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rath
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7